Calendula

Calendula

The name Calendula stems from the Latin kalendae, meaning first day of the month, presumably because pot marigolds are in bloom at the start of most months of the year.
The common name marigold probably refers to the Virgin Mary, or its old Saxon name ‘ymbglidegold’, which means ‘it turns with the sun’.
The most commonly cultivated and used member of the genus is the pot marigold). 
The flowers of Calendula officinalis contain flavonol glycosides, triterpene oligoglycosides, oleanane-type triterpene glycosides, saponins, and a sesquiterpene glucoside.

Uses of Caledula

Plant pharmacological studies have suggested that Calendula extracts have anti-viral, anti-genotoxic and anti-inflammatory properties.[4] Calendula in suspension or in tincture is used topically to treat acne, reducing inflammation, controlling bleeding and soothing irritated tissue. There is “limited evidence” that calendula cream or ointment is effective in treating radiation dermatitis. In a randomized study of 254 radiation patients, topical application of 4% calendula ointment resulted in far fewer occurrences of Grade 2 or higher dermatitis than occurred in the group using trolamine. Calendula users also experienced less radiation-induced pain and fewer breaks in treatment. 
Calendula has been used traditionally for abdominal cramps and constipation In experiments with rabbit jejunum the aqueous-ethanol extract of Calendula officinalis flowers was shown to have both spasmolytic and spasmogenic effects, thus providing a scientific rationale for this traditional use An aqueous extract of Calendula officinalis obtained by a novel extraction method has demonstrated anti-tumor (cytotoxic) activity and immunomodulatory properties (lymphocyte activation) in vitro, as well as anti-tumor activity in miceProduct’s Season is December- April
 Final Product:  Flowers, Petals.